Team-building activities present a unique dilemma to many business leaders. On the one hand, they can work really well, and the companies that use them effectively (Bay City Connections being one of them) enjoy collaboration and trust among coworkers. On the other hand, when group events fail, they fail big ‰ÛÒ costing everyone involved time and money, and having the opposite effect on morale than intended.

 

The challenge, then, is to find endeavors that are proven to build camaraderie and create forward momentum. Here are some suggestions that Bay City Connections leaders have found to do just that:

 

  • Dragon Boat Racing: The premise here is simple: drop 20 or so people into a 46-foot long boat, and make it go in one direction. Simple, but hardly easy. Just getting into the boat together takes a level of trust and communication that might never be achieved during normal business hours.

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  • Geocaching: This simplicity of this activity is what makes it appealing. Split your people into teams, hand them a GPS, and let them figure out for themselves how best to find the hidden geocache containers in a given area. It’s fun and effective in urban or rural areas.

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  • Wilderness Retreats: This is probably the most expensive and complicated method we use to build Our Bay City Connections team, but when done well the results are undeniable. Spending a whole weekend in the woods together allows teammates to get to know one another on a personal level, without the influence of office roles.

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Building a great team requires some investment, but the results are more than worth it. Give any or all of these suggestions a try.